Top Zombie Films of All Time

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z10 28 days later 1

1. 28 Days Later (2002)

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Initially of the newest millennium, horror was slowly on the rise thanks to inventive, ballsy genre fare that was pushing limits of what was expected from big screen fright flicks. It's safe to say that sub-genre had opted from undead to for real dead by this point. Thankfully, Danny Boyle chose to direct his first full on horror flick, 28 Days Later. That film reignited a complete sub-genre and proved that the huge infection film could possibly be delivered on a tiny dime. Top Zombie Films of All Time. Shot on DV tape, there exists a unique feel to the cinematography that'll likely never be duplicated in this kind of genre picture. In the end, the technology used to produce it has for ages been dead by this point.

The score, the soundtrack, the acting from all involved (including a function that virtually put Cillian Murphy on the map), and Boyle's inventive usage of the diminutive cameras all came together to make 28 Days Later a breath of fresh air upon its release. 

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2. Romero’s Dead Trilogy (1968 – 1985)

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Okay, I realize this might be described as a tad tiny cheat, but if it's angers you're feeling, you're absolve to bump the 2 towards the top off the list (sad face) and rank these three the manner in which you see fit. Top Zombie Films of All Time. Ultimately, I've grown to love Romero's original trilogy of Dead films all on pretty equal grounds. The man singlehandedly, well…with some assistance from John Russo, created an entire subgenre with one film, Nights the Living Dead (1968). It stands being an undisputed masterpiece of genre cinema that still supports all these years later. Or even for Night and one other two films here, we probably wouldn't have as much awesome films to position on this list. For this reason, Personally i think comfortable placing all three in the most truly effective spot. They're of equal importance to one another, and it's easy to pinpoint each one of these as “best of” types of the sub-genre.

When I first saw Night, I was much too young. My mom had rented a copy from the library thinking it had been a few old black and white flick like the The Black Bat which she brought home exactly the same day. Needless to say, Night was no Black Bat, and I was forever changed after watching it. Both Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Day of the Dead (1985) are exceptional as well. They stand as touchstones for the genre they created and types of the evolution of horror.

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3. Pontypool (2008)

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The initial and only film on the list to feature monsters that spread their sickness with no exchange of any bodily fluids. The creatures in this unique little indie are infected by language. That's right, it might sound bizarre, but as the very first in a proposed trilogy (still waiting on part 2…), Pontypool succeeds as a suspenseful chamber piece revolving around a shock jock and his producer, secluded in a radio station's studio as they slowly arrived at terms with the insanity that's occurring right outsideTop Zombie Films of All Time . It's a slow burn flick that requires a surprisingly well-worn trope (a DJ powerless to the horrors beyond the glass) and really utilizes the claustrophobic scenario.

By the climax of the film, my nerves are usually in shambles no matter how often times I've seen it. The infected here are of the fast paced variety, and their intensity when setting their sights on prey is unnerving. I can't help but yearn for a sequel that could open things up more. 

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4. [REC] (2007)

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I rarely consider zombie films to be scary. Usually, they're either gory, tense, or occasionally, funny. I am aware for some folks suspense and scares might be one in the same. For me personally, they differ. Suspense may be the mental unease of knowing the worst possible outcome and having to wait and see if it will transpire. Fear is definitely an irrational feeling that anything sometimes happens, being powerless from the unknown. Again, these are merely my distinctions between the two, but I bring this up because [REC] manages to illicit fear in what is a typically grounded subgenre.

By taking elements of possession (a more fear-based genre), cramming that into a closed down tenant saturated in demonic creatures and shooting it through the “Holy shit! This really is really happening!” lens of a found footage movie, [REC] became an intrinsic part of the recent living dead resurgence. 

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5. Return of the Living Dead (1985)

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I first saw Return of the Living Dead on MonsterVision with Joe Bob Briggs one late Saturday evening many moons ago. There isn't much to say about that one that hasn't recently been dissected and praised one hundred times before. Top Zombie Films of All Time. After going their separate ways post-Night of the Living Dead, Romero continued making his “of the Dead” films while John Russo go about trying to create the state sequel to the original. Hence, while Return is far removed from Night however you like and tone, oahu is the only film in the fractured series to refer back to the events of the original.

Needless to say, we also learn Night of the Living Dead was nothing more than a fictionalized version of the real events. Believe me, it's much less confusing than it might sound. By the end of your day, Return brought something fresh to the genre that hadn't been successfully mined at the time. Return of the Living Dead stands head and shoulders above many a zombie film as a result of inclusion of not merely hot pink, punk rock style but an abundance of comedy. If it weren't for this, we may have not gotten Shaun of the Dead. Return also excels by providing us characters worth rooting for and even a little bit of pathos for the creatures themselves. “It hurts to be dead.”

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6. Shaun of the Dead (2004)

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Shaun is a complete shlub who can't seem to obtain his life together, his love life in particular, but they can always depend on his closest friend, Ed. It's this highly relatable premise that launches us into one of the greatest undead movies from early aughts. While there's a lot of intestine ripping, head shots, and the stakes never feel low, Shaun of the Dead also manages to nab the distinction of being hilarious.

Shaun of the Dead was a fairly large success despite receiving a relatively limited release. It has gained a huge cult following. Unfortunately, that success also went on to inspire a barrage of low-budget imitators. 

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7. Train to Busan (2016)

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Here is the one film I had yet to see when building this list. I knew it was supposed to be the most effective zombie film in years and signify there is still life left in the undead. As a result of this, I knew I had to check it out before putting a hand to keypad. Obviously, I buy into the hype and only wish I had gotten to check it out in theaters last year during the film's limited run.

Train to Busan does very little to test and reinvent the wheel apart from a nice gimmick revolving around the infected's power to see. Beyond that minor tweak, this can be a straightforward survival tale of a father escorting his young daughter on a problem train ride to go to her mother. 

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8. Dead Alive (1992)

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Peter Jackson is not any stranger to genre fans. Spearheading the epic Lord of the Rings franchise has endeared his name to the hearts of geeks worldwide. However, before launching a bazillion dollar franchise, Jackson was busy turning in raunchy splat-stick flicks out of New Zealand. Dead Alive is possibly the absolute most fondly remembered of his early output. Why? It just so happens to be the goriest film ever made.

Feeling a lot like the Kiwi cousin to Evil Dead 2, Dead Alive is filled to the brim with bucket after bucket of blood and guts. It's a great deal to consume, and quite frankly – I wasn't sure how to take it all as a kid. I'll never forget renting a system of random scary flicks on VHS for my 12th birthday. Dead Alive was the last film we watched as sunlight was coming up the next morning. It was a delirious, sleep deprived, and confusing experience. The film is actually a comedy, but somehow my brain just couldn't compute what I was seeing at the time. 

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9. Zombie (1979)

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Lucio Fulci is a legend. Granted, for quite a while it seemed he was always considered the lesser of his contemporary, Dario Argento. Thankfully, in this day and age of Blu-ray bringing a fresh audience to his films with high-def transfers likely outshining his movies'original presentations, Fulci can rest knowing his special model of sleaze is appreciated. After George A. Romero's Dawn of the Dead was launched in Italy (under the title, Zombi) to boffo box office, producers were quick to get a “sequel” into production. The film was launched as Zombi 2 in Italy, though future releases have simply dropped the 2 to tamp down a number of the confusion.

Sans bookending scenes shot in New York included in a last-ditch effort to try and tie this film to Romero's, Zombie takes place entirely on a secluded island where voodoo has caused a massive onslaught of gut munching corpses. 

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10. Zombi 3 (1988)

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The number ten spot was a difficult one. It had been a toss up between this, Zombi 3, or the equally bonkers Italian munchfest, Burial Ground. It would be quite the challenge to label just one a good film per se. They're low budget films created with the sole intent behind capitalizing on the success Dawn of the Deadand Fulci's unofficial follow-up. Top Zombie Films of All Time. Why is them noteworthy is the amount of damn fun they are. In regards to the nice times, Zombi 3 just were able to edge out the competition.

Originally to be directed by the Italian gore-meister himself, Lucio Fulci, he was replaced after shooting over fifty percent of the film. 

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